Information Resources & Technology

SICKO - Surgical Improvement of Clinical Knowledge Ops

  • Overview

Learning Objectives

  • Apply safe surgical decision making skills through clinical practice when treating surgical conditions.
  • Develop skills to become discerning and efficient in the use of diagnostic tests in the approach to treating surgical diseases or problems.
  • Develop skills to improve triage and addressing multiple patient problems at once in a given time frame.
  • Develop skills to recognize and consistently treat acute cholecystitis by performing urgent laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
  • Develop skills to recognize and consistently treat acute appendicitis by performing laparoscopic appendectomy.

Surgical Improvement of Clinical Knowledge Ops

Internet Enduring Material Sponsored By:
Stanford University School of Medicine

Presented by:
The Department of Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Release Date:
    June 24, 2013
  • Expiration Date:
    June 24, 2015
  • Estimated Time to Complete:
    60 minutes
  • CME Processing Fee:
    $20

Disclosures

The following planners, and authors have indicated that they have no relationships with industry to disclose relative to the content of this activity:

James N. Lau, MD
Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery
Course Director

Lisa Shieh, MD, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine
Co-Course Director

Dana Lin, MD
Surgical Education Fellow
Planner

Julia Park, MD
Surgical Education Fellow
Planner

Technical Design and Development

Jamie Tsui
Stanford EdTech

Pauline Becker
Stanford EdTech

James Laird
Developer

Zak Akin
UI Designer

Jonathan Tatum
Quality Assurance/Data Analyst

Glenn Zephier
Graphic Artist

System Requirements

On desktop, requires latest Firefox with pop-ups allowed. Also runs on iPad or Android tablet. 1027x768 or higher resolution required.
Internet Explorer is not supported, and should be closed prior to opening the game.

Contact Information

For further information regarding the content, CME credit or if you experience any technical difficulties with this enduring material please send an email to stanfordcme@stanford.edu.

Please review all of the information here and click the button at the bottom of the page to begin the course.

To Obtain CME Credits:

- Review the information below and complete the entire activity
- Follow the link at the end of the activity to complete course evaluation, post-asessment and post-test
- Learners with a passing post-test score of at least 75% (3 out of 4 case-based questions) will receive a CME certificate via email to the address provided within 2 weeks from the date of receipt. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass the post-test.

Course Description

The course will fill the gap between didactic learning and clinical application in developing an interactive course that offers an opportunity to learn and apply surgical decision making skills for practicing surgeons in treating acute and sub-acute surgical conditions and complications.

Intended Audience

This course is designed to meet the educational needs of a national audience of practicing general surgeons.

Accreditation and Designation of Credits

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support Acknowledgement

Stanford University School of Medicine has received and has used undesignated program funding from Pfizer, Inc. to facilitate the development of innovative CME activities designed to enhance physician competence and performance and to implement advanced technology. A portion of this funding supports this activity.

California Assembly Bill 1195 – Cultural and Linguistic Competency

California Assembly Bill 1195 requires continuing medical education activities with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competency. It is the intent of the bill, which went into effect July 1, 2006, to encourage physicians and surgeons, CME providers in the State of California and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to meet the cultural and linguistic concerns of a diverse patient population through appropriate professional development. The planners and speakers of this CME activity have been encouraged to address cultural issues relevant to their topic area. The Stanford University School of Medicine Multicultural Health Portal also contains many useful cultural and linguistic competency tools including culture guides, language access information and pertinent state and federal laws. You are encouraged to visit the portal:

http://lane.stanford.edu/portals/cultural.html

Please note this is an educational tool and the clinical information found in this game is part of an enduring educational material. It should not take the place of practitioner decision-making in clinical circumstances.

Bibliography

Halpin V, Gupta A. Acute cholecystitis. Clin Evid (online). 2011 Dec 20; 2011. pii: 0411.

Casella F, Casazza G. Is amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid non-inferior to appendicectomy for the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis? Intern Emerg Med. 2011 Dec; 6(6):557-8. Epub 2011 Oct 2.

Wilms IM, De Hoog DE, de Visser DC, Janzing HM. Appendectomy versus antibiotic treatment for acute appendicitis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.2011 Nov 9;(11):CD008359.

Dixon E, Fowler DL, and Ghitulescu G. Cost-utility analysis of early versus delayed laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis. Can J Surg, Vol. 55, No 3, June 2012.

Hu Y, Peyre SE, Arriage AE, et al. Postgame Analysis: Using Video-Based Coaching for Continuous Professional Development. J Am Coll Surg. 2012; 214:115-24.

Servais EL, LaMorte WW, Agarwal S, et. al. Teaching Surgical Decision-Making: An Interactive, Web-Based Approach. J Surg Res. 2006; 134:102-6.

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